Google vs China

Internet censorship in China is an issues often discussed in last years and months. Some level of internet censorship occurs in majority of countries of the world yet and many internet companies try to deal with it. That happened in China, where the Internet Network Company Google refused to filter its search system. I find this cause of China well filling to my topic about the Internet censorship because here we can see how government’s internet regulation can result. We can also see that Internet Network Companies such as Google cope with the Internet censorship and try to fight against threating the human rights.

Few weeks ago, we could hear about a new cause of China with the Internet Company Google. The China’s restrictions on internet includes the blocking of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and also many foreign news sites and sites criticizing China’s government. China also bans the web pages with historical material illustrating the pro-democratic protests 20 years ago. For that reason, Google was asked to filter these sites in China and the Foreign Ministry of China also highly recommended to Google to abide by China’s laws if Google wants to do business there (Ho, 2010). That provokes big discussions all around the world and Google refused to filter its search system. From January 2010, Google threatened that the company will leave the country if China’s government will continue to call for censoring. Few days ago, Google came with solution and really left China. Google decided to move its China-based search system to Hong-Kong, the almost independent territory of China. That means if China citizens log on the China’s Google site, they will be automatically redirected to the Google in Hong-Kong. The Google search system in Hong-Kong is uncensored so Chine’s citizens can fully drive on benefits of the search system. China responded on the Google’s decision by accusing Google from the violating a written promise to filter its search service. The Chinese also fear that government will continue to ban the other Google’s applications such as Gmail or Google documents as a response to Google’s violating their laws (Ho, 2010).

We can only wait how this China-Google argument will continue, but we can be sure about one thing. Chinese government is bent to continue in censoring the Internet content and they well prepared for Google’s “pull-off”. The pro-government network companies in China are ready to replace Google and benefit from it.

References:

Ho, S. (2010). China Defends Its Internet Censorship Policies | Asia | English. News | English. Retrieved May 15, 2010, from http://www1.voanews.com/english/news/asia/China-Defends-Its-Internet-Censorship-Policies-88898007.html

Picture source:

China tagged with: Journalist. China Digital Times. Retrieved May 16, 2010, from http://chinadigitaltimes.net/china/journalists/

Video source:

Google to Pull Out of China?. YouTube- Broadcast Yourself. Retrieved May 15, 2010, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPSZ604_OPI

Video source:

YouTube – Google China. (n.d.).YouTube- Broadcast Yourself. Retrieved May 16, 2010, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-jkKFCxggY&feature=fvsr

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  1. Hey 🙂
    Very good and interesting topic for a blog. Nowadays when the news and information are more and more accessible it is harder to control it. That is what happened in China.

    I did not know about this issue before I read your article and I found it very interesting. I could not image living in a country, which government is trying to censorship some parts of their history from the internet. I believe that the government does not have the right to do so and I hope google is going to figure out a way. I wonder how is it issue going to end.

    • HvAiA
    • May 23rd, 2010

    I’ve heard about the censorship in China before, but your post is quite enlightening. This situation in China should be solved in with clear understanding from both sides, but it is truly difficult and not easy task to do, as it is described above the solution of “using Google through Hong-Kong” is most probably just a temporal. For me it is almost impossible to imagine to “work” in todays world, without Facebook, Google or major email network such as Gmail.
    Thanks

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